The Lion's Mane

asylum-art:

Li Xiaofeng: porcelain clothes

Some Mediterranean countries, such as Greece, have the millennial tradition of breaking the crockery to get rid of material goods in order to receive the New Year. The Chinese designer Li Xiaofeng was inspired by this tradition and found a way of recycling glass and porcelain remains in her new line of artistic clothing.

(via stillwaitsthesun)

nathanael-platier:

veralynn23:

Valerie Hegarty

Famous paintings come to life in 3D sculptures of nature’s destructive tendencies.

Is this IB ?

(Source: fem-arts, via taras-bulbasaur)

sosuperawesome:

Mini paintings on cedar by Cathy McMurray on Etsy

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Shintaro Ohata  Seamlessly Blends Sculpture and Canvas to Create 3D Paintings

When first viewing the artwork of Shintaro Ohata up close it appears the scenes are made from simple oil paints, but take a step back and you’re in for a surprise. Each piece is actually a hybrid of painted canvas and sculpture that blend almost flawlessly in color and texture to create a single image.

(Source: asylum-art, via maedhrys)

escapekit:

Papers for Characters

Spanish design studio Atipo has created a collection of minimalistic movie posters that are made from paper. 

Awesome. 

(via cleolinda)

mayahan:

Paper Sculptures by Peter Gentenaar

(Source: mymodernmet.com, via worldexperience)

jedavu:

Artist Henrique Oliveira Constructs a Cavernous Network of Repurposed Wood Tunnels at MAC USP

(via javert)

littlelimpstiff14u2:

image

artist • ocean advocate
Corallia Design

 

Our Changing Seas II

This large-scale ceramic coral reef sculptural installation is the second in Courtney Mattison’s Our Changing Seas series (the first is at AAAS headquarters in Washington DC). This piece was completed in September 2013 and is now on permanent display at the Nova Southeastern University Oceanographic Center’s Center of Excellence for Coral Reef Ecosystems Research in South Florida. It stands about nine feet tall, three by six feet wide and is entirely covered in hand-sculpted and glazed ceramic corals, sponges and other reef-dwelling invertebrates from Western Atlantic and Caribbean coral reefs. The piece depicts a 360° transition from a healthy, vibrant coral reef to a bleached and algal-dominated one and back again to illustrate the human-caused threats reefs face with a sense of hope for recovery. It took a year and a half, but it’s finally finished! A big thank-you to the NSU Oceanographic Center for commissioning this project!!

(via worldexperience)